After trash pickup delays, Louisiana Workforce Commission to help Metro Service Group


Metro Service Group, the company whose delayed service prompted some city leaders to declare trash left on curbsides a public health issue, is seeking help from a state agency to add to its staff. Metro CEO Jimmie Woods told WDSU’s Greg Larose a shortage of drivers is causing the delays in service, which has left residents complaining of odors and rodents. This week, some of Metro’s competitors helped make pickups in parts of the city Metro is supposed to serve. Metro announced Friday in a news release the company is also seeking help from the Louisiana Workforce Commission. The agency will help “in workforce development and recruitment” through online outreach, along with resources “to expand driver training,” the release said. “These programs the Louisiana Workforce Commission offers show they recognize the need for an innovative approach to help businesses in need, including ours, during these difficult times,” said Metro President Jimmy Woods. “We recognize that many residents of our service district have been inconvenienced by periodic delays as we have struggled to recruit and retain employees to conduct the difficult work of keeping the city’s streets clean with ever-increasing volumes during the pandemic.”Metro has also increased employee pay, the release says, to stay competitive “and meet the company’s obligation to the people of New Orleans.” They’ve also brought Metro employees who work outside of New Orleans into the city and subcontracted with other sanitation companies. Earlier this week, Woods told Larose he expects service to return to normal within 30 days.

Metro Service Group, the company whose delayed service prompted some city leaders to declare trash left on curbsides a public health issue, is seeking help from a state agency to add to its staff.

Metro CEO Jimmie Woods told WDSU’s Greg Larose a shortage of drivers is causing the delays in service, which has left residents complaining of odors and rodents. This week, some of Metro’s competitors helped make pickups in parts of the city Metro is supposed to serve.

Metro announced Friday in a news release the company is also seeking help from the Louisiana Workforce Commission. The agency will help “in workforce development and recruitment” through online outreach, along with resources “to expand driver training,” the release said.

“These programs the Louisiana Workforce Commission offers show they recognize the need for an innovative approach to help businesses in need, including ours, during these difficult times,” said Metro President Jimmy Woods. “We recognize that many residents of our service district have been inconvenienced by periodic delays as we have struggled to recruit and retain employees to conduct the difficult work of keeping the city’s streets clean with ever-increasing volumes during the pandemic.”

Metro has also increased employee pay, the release says, to stay competitive “and meet the company’s obligation to the people of New Orleans.” They’ve also brought Metro employees who work outside of New Orleans into the city and subcontracted with other sanitation companies.

Earlier this week, Woods told Larose he expects service to return to normal within 30 days.



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